Hair loss can be caused by a variety of sources. Most commonly, hair loss is caused by androgenic alopecia or male/female pattern baldness.

But in some cases, hair loss may be caused by an underlying medical condition. There are many conditions that involve hair loss as a symptom.

In order to treat hair loss, you will first need to know what’s causing it. If a more serious condition is the culprit, you may need to treat the condition before the hair loss can be addressed. In some cases, the hair loss will resolve on its own as the condition is treated. In other cases, the hair loss may need to be treated alongside the condition.

But remember, your overall health and wellbeing is most important. Make sure to give the utmost priority to treating the medical condition, and only treat the hair loss as approved by your doctor.

Below is a list of the most common medical conditions behind hair loss. In most cases, a simple blood test or physical exam with your doctor can provide a diagnosis.

Thyroid disease/hormonal imbalance. Hormones play an integral role in the growth and development of scalp hair. When hormones become imbalanced (through thyroid disease or other causes), hair can thin, fall out, and stop growing.

Alopecia areata. This condition may sound similar to the common hair loss condition androgenic alopecia, but it is in fact much different. Alopecia areata involves the immune system mistakenly identifying hair follicles as foreign bodies and attacking and destroying them.

Folliculitis/infection. The scalp can become infected just like the rest of the body. Infections of the hair follicle (folliculitis) can cause patches of hair loss across the scalp.

Chronic illness. Any ongoing chronic illness can cause hair loss. When the body undergoes long-term damage, it must prioritize body processes. Because hair growth is not a crucial component to body functioning, it is often cut of nutrients first.

Medications. Hair loss is a common side effect of certain medications. Drugs used to treat such conditions as arthritis, depression, heart issues, high blood pressure, and even birth control and been linked to hair loss.

If you think your hair loss may be caused by a medical condition, you should meet with your doctor as soon as possible to be tested for potential diseases. Once a disease has been diagnosed or ruled out, you can begin the process of addressing the hair loss. You’re not alone. Give us a call today.